I miss my boyfriend so much.

@1 day ago with 3 notes
treely3256:

hashtag-loser:

cloudcuckoolander527:

vaspider:

doctorblainewilliams:

thedoctorsherlock:

Why doesn’t this have a million notes?!

i love how the “did you drug them” has a little pit stop at “you’re evil”

As well it should.

I’ve reblogged this before but Imma do it again because a)it’s awesome and b) I have a specific voice when I say “Do not do the sex”.

This needs to be on a billboard and posters all around the world. Maybe even on menus are restaurants

Needs to be in bars

treely3256:

hashtag-loser:

cloudcuckoolander527:

vaspider:

doctorblainewilliams:

thedoctorsherlock:

Why doesn’t this have a million notes?!

i love how the “did you drug them” has a little pit stop at “you’re evil”

As well it should.

I’ve reblogged this before but Imma do it again because a)it’s awesome and b) I have a specific voice when I say “Do not do the sex”.

This needs to be on a billboard and posters all around the world. Maybe even on menus are restaurants

Needs to be in bars

(Source: saddestsad, via rhapsodic-wlvr)

@2 days ago with 495948 notes

mymodernmet:

Australian artist Meredith Woolnough (@meredithwoolnough) celebrates the beauty of nature in her stunning embroidery works. She uses a special sewing process to convey the intricate details of nature through delicate sculptures.

@2 days ago with 544 notes
wnderlst:

Finland | Mikko Karjalainen
@2 days ago with 5178 notes

magictransistor:

Asa Smith. Celestial Illustrations from Smith’s Illustrated Astronomy. 1851. 

Wood engravings with hand highlighting, written by the principal of Public School No. 12 in New York City with the goal “to present all the distinguishing principles in physical Astronomy with as few words as possible”.

@2 days ago with 8320 notes
@2 days ago with 562 notes

neuromorphogenesis:

Brain Encodes Time And Place Of Taste Memory

Have you ever eaten something totally new and it made you sick? Don’t give up; if you try the same food in a different place, your brain will be more “forgiving” of the new attempt. In a new study conducted by the Sagol Department of Neurobiology at the University of Haifa, researchers found for the first time that there is a link between the areas of the brain responsible for taste memory in a negative context and those areas in the brain responsible for processing the memory of the time and location of the sensory experience. When we experience a new taste without a negative context, this link doesn’t exist.

The area of the brain responsible for storing memories of new tastes is the taste cortex, found in a relatively insulated area of the human brain known as the insular cortex. The area responsible for formulating a memory of the place and time of the experience (the episode) is the hippocampus. Until now, researchers assumed that there was no direct connection between these areas – i.e., the processing of information about a taste is not related to the time or the place one experiences the taste. The accepted thinking was that a negative experience – for example, being exposed to a bad taste – would be negative in the same way anywhere, and the brain would create a memory of the taste itself, divorced from the time or place.

But in this new study, conducted by doctoral student Adaikkan Chinnakkaruppan in the laboratory of Prof. Kobi Rosenblum of the Sagol Department of Neurobiology at the University of Haifa, in cooperation with the Riken Institute, the leading brain research institute in Tokyo, the researchers demonstrate for the first time that there is a functional link between the two brain regions.

In the study the researchers sought to examine the relationship between the taste cortex (which is responsible for taste memory), and three different areas in the hippocampus: CA1, which is responsible for encoding the concept of space (where we are located); DG, the area responsible for encoding the time relationship between events; and CA3, responsible for filling in missing information. To do this the researchers took ordinary mice and mice that were genetically engineered by their Japanese colleagues such that these three areas of the brain functioned normally but were lacking plasticity, which did not allow new memories reliant on them to be created.

“In brain research, the manipulation we do must be very delicate and precise, otherwise the changes can make the entire experiment irrelevant to proving or refuting the research hypothesis,” said Prof. Rosenblum.

The mice were exposed to two new tastes, one that caused stomach pains (to mimic exposure to toxic food) and another that didn’t cause that feeling. By comparing the two groups it emerged that when the new taste was not accompanied by an association with toxic food, there was no difference between the normal mice and those whose various functional areas in the hippocampus didn’t allow plasticity. But when the taste caused a negative feeling, there was clear involvement of the CA1 area, which is responsible for encoding the space.

“The significance of this is that the moment we go back to the same place at which we experienced the taste associated with a bad feeling, subconsciously the negative memory will be much stronger than if we come to taste the same taste in a totally different place,” explained Prof. Rosenblum. Similarly, the DG area, which is responsible for encoding the time between incidents, was involved the more time that passed between the new taste and the stomach discomfort. “This means that even during a simple associative taste, the brain operates the hippocampus to produce an integrated experience that includes general information about the time between events and their location,” he said.

The findings, which were recently published in the Journal of Neuroscience, expose the complexity and richness of the simple sensory experiences that are engraved in our brains and that in most cases we aren’t even aware of. Moreover, the study can help explain behavioral results and the difficulty in producing memories when certain areas of the brain become dysfunctional following and illness or accident. The better we understand the encoding of simple sensory experiences in the brain and the link between the feeling, time and place of the experiences; we will better understand the complex process of creating memories and storing them in our brains.

@2 days ago with 141 notes

(Source: mandatownsend.com, via kaaarlo)

@2 days ago with 8647 notes
thespeedofthirtythree:

Tame Impala - Innerspeaker (2010)

thespeedofthirtythree:

Tame Impala - Innerspeaker (2010)

(via theweeebabyseamus)

@2 days ago with 1457 notes
ohstarstuff:

Spanning 4,000 light-years across, NGC 206 is the richest star cloud in M31 as well as one of the largest and brightest star formation regions of the Local Group. Also known as Andromeda, M31 is a spiral galaxy just 2.5 million light-years away. NGC 206 is near top center in this gorgeous close-up of the southwestern extent of Andromeda’s disk. The bright, blue stars of NGC 206 indicate its youth. In fact, its youngest massive stars are less than 10 million years old. 

ohstarstuff:

Spanning 4,000 light-years across, NGC 206 is the richest star cloud in M31 as well as one of the largest and brightest star formation regions of the Local Group. Also known as Andromeda, M31 is a spiral galaxy just 2.5 million light-years away. NGC 206 is near top center in this gorgeous close-up of the southwestern extent of Andromeda’s disk. The bright, blue stars of NGC 206 indicate its youth. In fact, its youngest massive stars are less than 10 million years old. 

@2 days ago with 556 notes

houseofmind:

Drawing Autism by Jill Mullin, a behavior analyst in NYC,  is a compilation of collected works by individuals that have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). 

As the author states in the inside cover of the book: 

Drawing Autism celebrates the artistry and self-expression of individuals diagnosed with autism while also serving as an accessible point of entry into understanding how ASD manifests itself. 

This beautiful book is divided into seven chapters that represent core characteristics in ASD:

1. Interaction: Individual and Societal

2. Repetition, Repetition, Repetition 

3. Getting From Here to There

4. Bird’s Eye View

5. Another World

6. It’s All History

7. Art for Art’s Sake

The book also contains a listing of the artists and bios, as well as interviews with the creators of the artwork. The artists answer questions related to the artwork, providing a personal view into the perspective of ASD as well as its manifestation. I personally really liked reading this because it highlights the diversity of the condition and the subjective experience (and thought process) of each individual. I also appreciate that the book advocates nurturing these creative talents in autistic individuals. I can’t help but wonder what artwork from individuals diagnosed with other disorders would look like…. 

I got my copy at a local comic book/graphic novel shop in Puerto Rico (shout out to Mondo Bizarro) but it is available at Amazon as well. 

@2 days ago with 157 notes
visualechoess:

Matterhorn Milky way - by: Roman Burri

visualechoess:

Matterhorn Milky way - by: Roman Burri

(Source: VisualEchoess, via visualechoess)

@3 days ago with 3051 notes