nare-bear:

kitd-fohs:

salmonslushie:

i saw this on one of those strange little picture slideshow websites so i decided to post it ;) have fun kids

I have found heaven and it’s full of liquor

BRUH

(via pejina)

@13 hours ago with 99979 notes
delta-breezes:

Aleksandra Zee
@13 hours ago with 1377 notes
collinhughes:

Chaîne de la Selle, Haiti

collinhughes:

Chaîne de la Selle, Haiti

(via y3sac)

@13 hours ago with 138 notes
neurosciencestuff:

Glucose ‘control switch’ in the brain key to both types of diabetes
Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have pinpointed a mechanism in part of the brain that is key to sensing glucose levels in the blood, linking it to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The findings are published in the July 28 issue of Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences.
“We’ve discovered that the prolyl endopeptidase enzyme — located in a part of the hypothalamus known as the ventromedial nucleus — sets a series of steps in motion that control glucose levels in the blood,” said lead author Sabrina Diano, professor in the Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, Comparative Medicine, and Neurobiology at Yale School of Medicine. “Our findings could eventually lead to new treatments for diabetes.”
The ventromedial nucleus contains cells that are glucose sensors. To understand the role of prolyl endopeptidase in this part of the brain, the team used mice that were genetically engineered with low levels of this enzyme. They found that in absence of this enzyme, mice had high levels of glucose in the blood and became diabetic.
Diano and her team discovered that this enzyme is important because it makes the neurons in this part of the brain sensitive to glucose. The neurons sense the increase in glucose levels and then tell the pancreas to release insulin, which is the hormone that maintains a steady level of glucose in the blood, preventing diabetes.
“Because of the low levels of endopeptidase, the neurons were no longer sensitive to increased glucose levels and could not control the release of insulin from the pancreas, and the mice developed diabetes.” said Diano, who is also a member of the Yale Program in Integrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism.
Diano said the next step in this research is to identify the targets of this enzyme by understanding how the enzyme makes the neurons sense changes in glucose levels. “If we succeed in doing this, we could be able to regulate the secretion of insulin, and be able to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes,” she said.

neurosciencestuff:

Glucose ‘control switch’ in the brain key to both types of diabetes

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have pinpointed a mechanism in part of the brain that is key to sensing glucose levels in the blood, linking it to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The findings are published in the July 28 issue of Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences.

“We’ve discovered that the prolyl endopeptidase enzyme — located in a part of the hypothalamus known as the ventromedial nucleus — sets a series of steps in motion that control glucose levels in the blood,” said lead author Sabrina Diano, professor in the Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, Comparative Medicine, and Neurobiology at Yale School of Medicine. “Our findings could eventually lead to new treatments for diabetes.”

The ventromedial nucleus contains cells that are glucose sensors. To understand the role of prolyl endopeptidase in this part of the brain, the team used mice that were genetically engineered with low levels of this enzyme. They found that in absence of this enzyme, mice had high levels of glucose in the blood and became diabetic.

Diano and her team discovered that this enzyme is important because it makes the neurons in this part of the brain sensitive to glucose. The neurons sense the increase in glucose levels and then tell the pancreas to release insulin, which is the hormone that maintains a steady level of glucose in the blood, preventing diabetes.

“Because of the low levels of endopeptidase, the neurons were no longer sensitive to increased glucose levels and could not control the release of insulin from the pancreas, and the mice developed diabetes.” said Diano, who is also a member of the Yale Program in Integrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism.

Diano said the next step in this research is to identify the targets of this enzyme by understanding how the enzyme makes the neurons sense changes in glucose levels. “If we succeed in doing this, we could be able to regulate the secretion of insulin, and be able to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes,” she said.

@13 hours ago with 157 notes

(Source: urbnite, via benjamminteo)

@16 hours ago with 1455 notes
delta-breezes:

Nicole Franzen
@19 hours ago with 1622 notes

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@13 hours ago with 2998 notes

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@13 hours ago with 50091 notes

jonahreenders:

Munising Falls

By: Jonah Reenders

(Source: jonahreenders.com, via y3sac)

@13 hours ago with 3432 notes

bostonprepster:

My friends and I love this

(Source: wavedways, via samzhangg)

@15 hours ago with 166444 note and 1626347 play

The bit of your brain that signals how bad things could be 

neurosciencestuff:

An evolutionarily ancient and tiny part of the brain tracks expectations about nasty events, finds new UCL research.

The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, demonstrates for the first time that the human habenula, half the size of a pea, tracks predictions…

(Source: eurekalert.org)

@16 hours ago with 224 notes

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@19 hours ago with 25754 notes